What Makes Texas Special

What makes this place — Texas — so special?

In front of the Bexar County Courthouse, the old, historic red building? There is this tile.

That’s just part of it.

Just part of Bexar County.

Then there’s reminder of the cost of freedom. Hint: it ain’t cheap.

Less than a hundred square meters of downtown, sort of sums it all up. Yes, it’s a special place.

Don’t forget the cockpit in front of the cathedral. Another special moment.

Etched in stone, no less.

Bits and pieces of what makes Texas special, a certain kind of, “No? Really?”

There’s another acronym, but I like thinking it’s what makes Texas special.

HEB Chips

Two Texas Artists:

Lyle Lovett (Scorpio) —
Step Inside This House Covers of Texas music by Lyle Lovett, certainly not a book, but as poetry, one of the finest collections ever, and one I’ve bought and given away a number of times. One of the most powerful collections of songs, part of a soundtrack to my life.

Robert Earl Keen (Capricorn) —
Live #2 by Robert Earl Keen. Recorded live at Floore’s Country Store, a remarkable venue in itself, the album captures a hot, sticky night under the oaks, with a songwriter who evokes the very feelings… It’s a lot of Texas in one place. Loss, lament, love, immigration (before it was an issue), all of that plus an anthem to the five-pound bass. Since I’ve been introduced, it’s a integral part of my life’s soundtrack. Again and again.

Rerun:
Still a favorite.

Writer’s Block:
Seriously?

Spell-breaker:
I’m always worried, and slightly superstitious, about writing about writing, as that’s a dangerous area. However, I’m quite pleased, as looked over the usual work load, I’ve started on the July Horoscopes and it’s only the beginning of June. Good start.

I had such a good run with the byline project, here at Sky Friday, as I had a series of entries, pulled together at different times, just all stacked up and looked wonderful.

History and Myth
(The American South West in History)
A Friendly Wager
Local Pro Sports (GO SPURS GO)
Austin in the Sand
(Texas Gulf Coast)
The Pass to the North
(El Paso)

Individually, there’s good material, at least, content that I’m happy with, and that’s all that matters at this point. Together, though, there’s an even more poignant observation, as the material covers Texas Gulf Coast, South Texas, and stretches to West Texas with its High Desert.

In the last six, eight weeks, I’ve seen freezing cold, hurricane-force winds, torrential downpours, and blistering heat. Just part of my world, nothing unusual.


astrofish.net/books

The shoulder of the fabled Hill Country, the eastern flank of the escarpment that divides the hills from gentle, rolling coastal prairies, this has been my home for so long, I don’t care if I never go any place else. From the high, heart-breaking beauty of the desert to the rolling, gentle, fertile and rich coastal grasslands, this is it.

About the author: Born and raised in East Texas, Kramer Wetzel, settled in a South Austin trailer park before trailer parks were cool. He now lives in San Antonio, Texas.

Next post:

Previous post: